Gods, jade and sulphur – the Diamond Falls Botanical Gardens in St Lucia

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Looking out at grey skies today, it’s a joy to go back through posts from just a month ago and pick out ones from our visit to the Botanical Gardens in St Lucia.

The gardens from part of the legacy of the Devaux family who owned the land since 1713, and which used to be part of a working plantation that once produced limes, copra (dried coconut kernels) and cocoa.

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The jewel of the gardens is the Jade vine, according to the vine ‘first seen by westerners in 1854,’ and still making us gasp…

and a different sensory experience, of course, is the mineral baths and waterfall – the minerals in the water apparently helping those suffering from chronic rheumatism, respiratory complaints or ulcers. I guess sometimes you don’t want the water to run clear…

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We ‘took’ the baths, seen here as they are now and after a less welcome visit from Hurricane Tomas…

…stood admiring the extraordinary waterfall…

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And gloried in the glories of our guide, Alexander (the Great)…

 

St Lucia of course is also the home of Derek Walcott, the poet and playwright and recipient of the Nobel Prize for Literature. Here’s an extract from The Prodigal which sums up the island for me…

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And here’s a photograph of the Pitons, just up the road from the gardens. We climbed the Gros Piton, easier than the Petit Piton unless of course you are Alexander the Great.

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The last tree…

One of the highlights of the last summer was a trip to the Gothenburg Botanical Garden. There was so much to see that we decided to spread our visit out over two days, which was lucky because on our first trip, we’d completely overlooked the Sophora Toromiro…

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And why should that matter? It looks like a little, not to be rude, insignificant?

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Well, as the label above suggests, this little gem is actually one of the last remaining trees of its species. I couldn’t stop thinking about that line – that it was thought to be in danger of extinction ‘mainly due to human endeavours.’

Endeavour = to try hard to do or achieve something.

Makes you proud, doesn’t it? Maybe if the tree had been put in a special cage, or viewing room, it would be less affecting. It was also so moving to see how normal the tree was. I’d built it up in my mind. THE LAST TREE OF ITS KIND….

In my defence, it’s not often you get to see an almost extinct species, and because of that – especially in the middle of all the other green fertile bounty of the botanical garden – there was a certain thrill to it. Rather like funerals can sometimes make you think about life.

And how ordinary and insignificant – and therefore beautiful – that can be.

Here’s the poem that came up…

If this was our last night
Sarah Salway

Please let us still
watch television, let me
get angry at how you
never bother to ask
if you can change channels,
let the shepherds pie
be burnt, the tomato ketchup
finished, another bottle
of wine gone. Let the wind
catch our garden gate,
the apples lie where they fall.
Let’s not bother to call
our mothers, children, friends,
but moan as usual
about meetings and to do lists,
plan Christmas and work
on the allotment, let us finish
our books later in bed,
let me be wearing those glasses
you hate, let us turn off
our lights in unison, and for you
to whisper, I love you,
and turn it into a song,
IloveyouIloveyouIloveyou.
Let me drift off to that.