Gods, jade and sulphur – the Diamond Falls Botanical Gardens in St Lucia

IMG_5476

Looking out at grey skies today, it’s a joy to go back through posts from just a month ago and pick out ones from our visit to the Botanical Gardens in St Lucia.

The gardens from part of the legacy of the Devaux family who owned the land since 1713, and which used to be part of a working plantation that once produced limes, copra (dried coconut kernels) and cocoa.

IMG_5706

The jewel of the gardens is the Jade vine, according to the vine ‘first seen by westerners in 1854,’ and still making us gasp…

and a different sensory experience, of course, is the mineral baths and waterfall – the minerals in the water apparently helping those suffering from chronic rheumatism, respiratory complaints or ulcers. I guess sometimes you don’t want the water to run clear…

IMG_5526

We ‘took’ the baths, seen here as they are now and after a less welcome visit from Hurricane Tomas…

…stood admiring the extraordinary waterfall…

IMG_5525

And gloried in the glories of our guide, Alexander (the Great)…

 

St Lucia of course is also the home of Derek Walcott, the poet and playwright and recipient of the Nobel Prize for Literature. Here’s an extract from The Prodigal which sums up the island for me…

walcott

And here’s a photograph of the Pitons, just up the road from the gardens. We climbed the Gros Piton, easier than the Petit Piton unless of course you are Alexander the Great.

IMG_5804

Snowdrops rising like lanterns

 

A5Uy69uITmuPNxcmluq73Q

Winter Garden
by Sarah Salway

Like the pilgrim divests himself of worldly goods,
the garden’s stripped back to a skeleton,

only the vertebrae of paths holds its truest form
and even as trees hold blossom close, buds aching,

it’s still the cutting back that matters most,
while through it all the river’s artery rolls,

a trust in what lies beneath, snowdrops
rising like lanterns to show the way.

w4cXiXWASI2potz4C8w9Mw

 

 

Remembering Capability Brown – Lady Nature’s Second Husband – and a little bit of Compton Verney

 

The English landscape gardener, Lancelot (Capability) Brown died 236 years ago today, 6th February 1783 – and fittingly is remembered on Twitter, via @BrownCapability:

“Your Dryads must go into black gloves, Madam. Their father-in-law Lady Nature’s second husband, is dead! Mr Brown dropped down at his own door yesterday” wrote Horace Walpole to Lady Ossory on 7th February 1783.
Above is a photograph of that very front door – next to a branch of Prezzo. Would Lancelot have been on Twitter, would he have popped out for a pizza?
IMG_6290
It’s lovely today then to think of where he might have felt at home, one of those places being beautiful Compton Verney where he designed the landscape and I was lucky enough to have a residency last year. Here are some photos from that time, and below them a poem to remember him. The form of the poem is a specular or mirror, which feels appropriate given the constantly changing reflections on the lake at Compton Verney.

 

Views Reflected
by Sarah Salway

Brown’s contemporary, Richard Owen Cambridge, longed to get to heaven before Brown, so he could see it before the great landscape gardener had ‘improved’ it.

By the time it was heaven’s turn,
the formal landscape of England
had changed forever:
a gardener and a duke
working harmoniously together.
Scattered trees,
a serpentine lake,
the ‘gardenless’ garden
painted a new picture –
Brown, nature’s second husband,
moving mountains from his path.

Moving mountains from his path,
Brown, nature’s second husband,
painted a new picture –
the ‘gardenless’ garden,
a serpentine lake,
scattered trees
working harmoniously together.
A gardener and a duke
had changed forever
the formal landscape of England
by the time it was heaven’s turn.

Silence in the nature reserve

And a happy new year to you all! I think it’s still all right to say that, but this has been my theme recently… just a little too late!

We spent the weekend after the new year in the middle of silence. It was beautiful. I’d been wanting to stay at the Elmley Nature Reserve on the Isle of Sheppey for some time, and it was everything I dreamed of.

We took the little but beautiful Salt Box, which contains a bed, kitchen and bathroom but more importantly this view when we woke up in the morning….

We didn’t take advantage of the outdoor shower – surprisingly! But we did spend time reading, thinking and walking. I made a list of all the gardens I’ve visited this year and haven’t shared with you here, so – again late to the party – I’ll be catching up with them soon.

But in the meantime, enjoy this video taken just outside our little cabin before I sat down to write…

 

Which made me think of this poem, Silence by Billy Collins. Here’s an extract:

And there is the silence of this morning
which I have broken with my pen,
a silence that had piled up all night
like snow falling in the darkness of the house—
img_5013